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20130125
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the most influence on my foreign policy was woman. the people who were in charge of moving forward my most important domestic initiative, health care, were women. the person in charge of our homeland security was woman. my two appointments to the supreme court were women. and 50% of my white house staff were women. so i think people should expect that that record will be built upon during the next four years. >> well, is the criticism fair against the president that's been thrown at him? falling short of his problem of being a champion for women. howard fineman is an msnbc political analyst. and "huffington post" has been facing obama. the road forward. and dee dee meyers. you were kind of a pioneers in all this. i watch this. and maybe there's tokenism. which is maybe better than nothing. you wonder about the decision how they made it to make it look good. what's better to make it look bad by not doing it or to look good when you don't intend to have that person in there? >> the best is to put people in with the best authority and do it right. i think the president's -- >> why is it happe
with the foreign policy is to move it in a new direction. >> it means he's going back to cairo. the speech he gave in june, 2009, he's going back to cairo. >> let's talk about that. let me talk about this. i think what i'm hearing from robin right, some real experts in the middle east. we may not be able to, but if we can, and they do proceed on it and once we attack them, we will never be able to talk them out of it. they will go back and do it again and again and again. if we go to war with them, it will be an unending struggle. we have a little time to talk them out of it. and i think that's what he's trying to send, this big message. to say you know what, i don't think cheney wanted peace. i think he wanted a war. but maybe this guy will give us something? that puts us in a position where we can say yes, we're not going to go nuclear. we're not going to do it. that's what they want. they want trade. they want economic opportunity. maybe they want to join the world. >> and the thing is, he's backed up these words by picking chuck hagel, the guy who understands war. >> hagel is somebody who cons
internally in this white house. and that in all likelihood some kind of foreign policy controversy will take over and dominate the second term like happens in most second terms. and he's very well versed in those areas. >> kelly, dennis mcdonough is probably known to most americans for his involvement on foreign policy, the raid to get osama bin laden, the surge in afghanistan. what about his relationship, though, with congress which will be more important now? >> reporter: well, when you're in a chief of staff position, you're the ultimate gatekeeper. and so a relationship with congress can center on a couple things. we saw bill daly when he was serving the president, had a different kind of style, that didn't have a lot of interaction with congress. rahm emanuel who had been of congress, a real understanding of how the body works. and to it will be interesting to see, especially because so much of that chief of staff role is about sort of the domestic playing field, how he will bring his skill set. so it's really about management. it's really about trying to keep the president on task and
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4